NORTH AMERICAN CRANE WORKING GROUP
HOME ABOUT NEWS WORKSHOPS PUBLICATIONS AWARDS JOIN CONTACT
 
~ L. H. Walkinshaw Award winners ~
JAKE VALENTINE
Jacob M. Valentine, retired biologist of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, became the first recipient of the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in honor of his long-time contribution to the study and conservation of cranes. The award was presented on 11 January 1996 at the Seventh North American Crane Workshop in Biloxi, Mississippi. Jake has authored approximately 25 papers on cranes and spent more than 30 years conducting research on the Mississippi sandhill crane. His work was a major factor in creation of Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge.
Jake Valentine - Photo courtesy of USFWS.
 

Dr. James C. Lewis, retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, former U.S. Coordinator of whooping crane research and reintroduction activities, and former leader of the U.S. Whooping Crane Recovery Team, received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in honor of his decades of achievement including serving as chief editor of 4 of the 8 volumes of the North American Crane Workshops. The award was presented on 14 January 2000 at the Eighth North American Crane Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Dr. George F. Gee, retired biologist of the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and former director of the crane propagation program at Patuxent received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in honor of his long-time contribution to the study and conservation of cranes. George has spent more than 30 years conducting research and authored numerous papers on cranes. The award was presented on 25 January 2003 at the Ninth North American Crane Workshop in Sacramento, California.

Stephen A. Nesbitt, avian biologist of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in honor of his career spanning more than 30 years of crane research and conservation. Steve is the world authority on the Florida sandhill crane and has authored or coauthored more than 60 publications on cranes. The award was presented on 10 February 2006 at the Tenth North American Crane Workshop in Zacatecas, Mexico.

Ernie Kuyt, retired Canadian Wildlife Service Biologist, received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in honor of his long-time contribution to the study and conservation of whooping cranes. Ernie spent 25 years conducting research on whooping cranes on their breeding grounds and has authored over 30 papers including 19 cited in the International Whooping Crane Recovery Plan. The award was presented on 26 September 2008 at the Eleventh North American Crane Workshop in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin.

Brian Johns, retired Canadian Wildlife Service Biologist, received the L. H. Walkinshaw Award in honor of his 36 distinguished years with CWS, during which he conducted research on numerous avian species in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. His research on whooping cranes included population monitoring, philopatry, effects of egg collection and the banding of juvenile whooping cranes,habitat analysis/ Brian logged over 1500 hours of aerial surveys over the crane nesting area at Wood Buffalo Park and authored over 20 publications. He was Canadian Whooping Crane Coordinator, and co-chaired the Canada/United States Whooping Crane Recovery Team since 2003. The award was presented on 16 March 2011 at the Twelfth North American Crane Workshop in Grand Island, Nebraska.

Dr. Gary Krapu, retired biologist of the USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in recognition of his long-term commitment to better understand the needs of Sandhill Cranes in the Platte River ecosystem, for having initiated a comprehensive, long-term, research program to guide conservation and management of the mid-continental population of Sandhill Cranes, and for collaborative research efforts with crane biologists from other nations to help guide crane conservation internationally. The award was presented on 17 April 2014 at the Thirteenth North American Crane Workshop in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Tom Stehn, retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, received the L. H. Walkinshaw Crane Conservation Award in recognition of his dedicated commitment to whooping crane conservation during his 32 years in the Service, including 29 years as Aransas biologist and 14 years as U.S. Whooping Crane Coordinator. Under Tomís careful watch and documentation, the Aransas/Wood Buffalo population grew from 70 to more than 300 birds. The current flock is a testament to his biological professionalism, which will provide the foundation for continued protection and growth of the population. The award was presented on 13 January 2017 at the Fourteenth North American Crane Workshop in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

 
 
 
All images, video, text, and other items on this website
© 2009 North American Crane Working Group - for details <click here>